Compare Gold and Silver Prices

Compare Gold and Silver Prices

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India Bans Largest Bills Without Warning

Indian Rupee

India abolished banknotes last night without warning, triggering trading chaos in the country. As of midnight Wednesday, 500 and 1,000 rupee notes are no longer valid. Many ATMs are closed, and stores will no longer accept bank notes, which are the highest denominations in India. Even hospitals are reported to say no, even though they…

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Hillary Heard a Fly Buzz When She Died

A fly landed on Hillary’s face during the October 9 presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, and I was immediately reminded of a poem by Emily Dickinson. I heard a Fly buzz – when I died – (591) By Emily Dickinson I heard a Fly buzz – when I died – The Stillness…

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Swedish MSM Web Sites Simultaneously Remove Comment Sections

Swedish Censorship

In recent months, all Swedish main-stream media (MSM) have simultaneously removed comment sections from their websites, thereby silencing the voice of the people. What could have possibly caused this “coincidence” on such a broad scale? Background I’m an American who has been living in Sweden for over 18 years.  When I first moved here, the…

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Gift Idea: Real Silver Treasure for Your Kids

Real Silver Treasure Chest

Looking for that perfect gift for your kid’s birthday? Instead of buying plastic crap that’s made in China, how about getting a treasure chest full of real silver coins! I usually put a silver coin in the kids’ Christmas stockings, and sometimes I use silver coins as a part of the gift wrapping for special…

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Hannes Tulving Sentenced 30 Months in Prison and $10 Million in Fines

Hannes Tulving

Hannes Tulving of The Tulving Company–which filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy protection on March 11, 2014–has been sentenced to 30 months imprisonment and $10 million in fines. Of course the $10 million goes to the government, and not the 380 customers that he defrauded for over $15 million. Full Press Release CHARLOTTE, N.C. – A…

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How You Could Make 50 Times Your Money in the Coming Gold Mania

gold-prices-300x196.jpg

By Doug Casey Regular readers know why I believe the gold price is poised to move from its current level of $1,250 per ounce to $1,500…$2,000…and eventually past $3,000. Right now, we are exiting the eye of the giant financial hurricane that we entered in 2007, and we’re going into its trailing edge. It’s going…

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Swedish Central Bank Lowers Interest Rate to -0.5 Percent

Stefan Ingves

The Swedish central bank, Riksbank, lowered the interest rate to -0.5% at 09:30 this morning (local time). Stefan Ingves,  governor of the Swedish central bank, presented his new record-low interest rate from the Governor House in Stockholm. The interest rate was lowered to -0.5 percent from the previous -0.35 percent. Usually when central banks lower…

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Albert Edwards Predicts 75% Decline in S&P

Albert Edwards

Usually posts in the Watchlist category have a target date, but this time I made an exception because the prediction is so profound. According to Edwards, Société Générale’s global strategist and prominent perma-bear, the S&P 500 could falls as much as 75%, from the recent peak of 2,100 to 550. Edwards stated: If I am…

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Oregon Militia Showdown: The Truth About The Hammonds

I’m posting this for the historical records (source). I am in direct, daily contact with a close friend who has lived and worked in Burns his entire life – except for a short stint with the 101st. He has worked in the woods (timber faller) on ranches (cowboy), and as a gunsmith in a local…

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Misguided Plans to Fix the Fed Part 1: Bernie Sanders

Starting with a recent op-ed in the New York Times by Bernie Sanders, let’s take a look at various proposals floating around to fix the Fed and other central banks.

Bernie Sanders says To Rein In Wall Street, Fix the Fed

Sanders: Wall Street is still out of control. Seven years ago, the Federal Reserve and the Treasury Department bailed out the largest financial institutions in this country because they were considered too big to fail. But almost every one is bigger today than it was before the bailout. If any were to fail again, taxpayers could be on the hook for another bailout, perhaps a larger one this time.

To rein in Wall Street, we should begin by reforming the Federal Reserve, which oversees financial institutions and which uses monetary policy to maintain price stability and full employment. Unfortunately, an institution that was created to serve all Americans has been hijacked by the very bankers it regulates.

Mish: That type of populist proposal will appeal to those who believe Wall Street is the problem. It will also appeal to those who understand the Fed is indeed in bed with Wall Street. But we must analyze Sanders’ specific recommendations one-by-one.

Sanders: The recent decision by the Fed to raise interest rates is the latest example of the rigged economic system. Big bankers and their supporters in Congress have been telling us for years that runaway inflation is just around the corner. They have been dead wrong each time. Raising interest rates now is a disaster for small business owners who need loans to hire more workers and Americans who need more jobs and higher wages. As a rule, the Fed should not raise interest rates until unemployment is lower than 4 percent. Raising rates must be done only as a last resort — not to fight phantom inflation.

Mish: Sanders ignores the dotcom bubble, the housing bubble, and the bubbles now in both stocks and bonds. Those bubbles all have their roots in a Fed that kept rates too low, too long. The idea that rates should be tied to a single measure like unemployment is ludicrous. And at 4% unemployment rates, the Fed would seldom if ever hiked. The Fed does not know where interest rates should be, and neither does Sanders. 

Sanders: What went wrong at the Fed? The chief executives of some of the largest banks in America are allowed to serve on its boards. During the Wall Street crisis of 2007, Jamie Dimon, the chief executive and chairman of JPMorgan Chase, served on the New York Fed’s board of directors while his bank received more than $390 billion in financial assistance from the Fed. Next year, four of the 12 presidents at the regional Federal Reserve Banks will be former executives from one firm: Goldman Sachs. These are clear conflicts of interest, the kind that would not be allowed at other agencies. We would not tolerate the head of Exxon Mobil running the Environmental Protection Agency. We don’t allow the Federal Communications Commission to be dominated by Verizon executives. And we should not allow big bank executives to serve on the boards of the main agency in charge of regulating financial institutions.

Mish: The conflicts of interest are indeed obvious. The solution is to get rid of the Fed.

Sanders: The Fed must also make sure that financial institutions are investing in the productive economy by providing affordable loans to small businesses and consumers that create good jobs. How? First, we should prohibit commercial banks from gambling with the bank deposits of the American people. Second, the Fed must stop providing incentives for banks to keep money out of the economy. Since 2008, the Fed has been paying financial institutions interest on excess reserves parked at the central bank — reserves that have grown to an unprecedented $2.4 trillion. That is insane. Instead of paying banks interest on these reserves, the Fed should charge them a fee that would be used to provide direct loans to small businesses.

Mish: I agree the Fed should prohibit commercial banks from gambling with the bank deposits of the American people. The way to do that is end fractional reserve lending. Lending deposits that are supposed to be available on demand is fraudulent. Paying interest on excess reserves the Fed creates out of thin air is also fraudulent. However, the notion the Fed should charge interest on reserves to spur lending is ridiculous. Mathematically, every dollar the Fed prints has to be held by someone. When banks lend, the money eventually ends up as a deposit somewhere else. Moreover, efforts to force banks to make more loans will just encourage bad lending decisions and subsequent writeoffs.

Sanders: As a condition of receiving financial assistance from the Fed, large banks must commit to increasing lending to creditworthy small businesses and consumers, reducing credit card interest rates and fees, and providing help to underwater and struggling homeowners.

Mish: Banks should not be bailed out or given assistance ever. To do so creates a moral hazard.

Sanders: We also need transparency. Too much of the Fed’s business is conducted in secret, known only to the bankers on its various boards and committees. Full and unredacted transcripts of the Federal Open Market Committee must be released to the public within six months, not five years, which is the custom now. If we had made this reform in 2004, the American people would have learned about the housing bubble well in advance of the financial crisis.

Mish: The housing bubble was obvious to every thinking person. Yet, the idea minutes would prove the Fed knew are highly unlikely. The Fed has never spotted a bubble. And neither the Fed nor Sanders sees the bubbles we are in now. That said, I fully support transparency and the release of full and unredacted transcripts.

Sanders has some things right, but as many things wrong.

We should audit the Fed and end it, not attempt to fix it with absurd rules about where interest rates should be, coupled with preposterous efforts to force banks to lend.

Mike “Mish” Shedlock

Mike “Mish” Shedlock is a registered investment advisor representative for SitkaPacific Capital Management. Sitka Pacific is an asset management firm whose goal is strong performance and low volatility, regardless of market direction.
Visit http://www.sitkapacific.com/account_management.html to learn more about wealth management and capital preservation strategies of Sitka Pacific.

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